Program and Services

ADHD

ADHD;stands for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, a condition with symptoms such as inattentiveness, impulsivity, and hyperactivity. ADHD was previously called ADD, or attention deficit disorder. Children and adults can have ADHD, while the symptoms always begin in childhood. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a complex mental health disorder that can affect your child's success at school and their relationships. The symptoms of (ADHD)vary and are sometimes difficult to recognize. ADHD is generally diagnosed in children by the time they're teens. Oppositional Defiant Disorder. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) affects children and teens and can continue into adulthood.ADHD is the most commonly diagnosed mental disorder of children. Children with ADHD may be hyperactive and unable control their impulses. Or they may have trouble paying attention. Early 1900s. ADHD was cited first in 1902. According to Sir George who described an abnormal defect of moral control in children. He found that affected children could not control their behavior the way a typical child would, but they were still intelligent. These children are often disobedient and have outbursts of temper. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder(ADHD) affects children and teens and can continue into adulthood.

Autism

A pervasive developmental disorder,autism affects information processing in multiple ways. Many people with autism have difficulties with social interactions and communication, sensory deficits, and poor motor coordination. People with autism often have restricted interests and engage in repetitive behaviors. Because autism's symptoms vary greatly, the condition is said to exist on a spectrum, referred to as Autism Spectrum Disorder. Autism usually manifests by age two. It affects far more males than females. The frequency of diagnosis has surged over the past 20 years; it is not clear whether the incidence is truly increasing, whether experts are more alert to it, or whether the diagnosis has nnxshifted to include lesser degrees of impairment.

Depression

Depression (major depressive disorder) is a common and serious medical illness that negatively affects how you feel, the way you think and how you act. Fortunately, it is also treatable. Depression causes feelings of sadness and/or a loss of interest in activities once enjoyed. It can lead to a variety of emotional and physical problems and can decrease a persons ability to function at work and at home. Depression symptoms can vary from mild to severe and can include: Feeling sad or having a depressed mood. Loss of interest or pleasure in activities once enjoyed. Changes in appetite - weight loss or gain unrelated to dieting. Trouble sleeping or sleeping too much. Loss of energy or increased fatigue. Increase in purposeless physical activity (e.g., hand-wringing or pacing) or slowed movements and speech (actions observable by others). Feeling worthless or guilty. Difficulty thinking, concentrating or making decisions. Thoughts of death or suicide. The death of a loved one, loss of a job or the ending of a relationship are difficult experiences for a person to endure. It is normal for feelings of sadness or grief to develop in response to such situations. Those experiencing loss often might describe themselves as being depressed. But being sad is not the same as having depression.

OCD

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is a mental health disorder that affects people of all ages and walks of life, and occurs when a person gets caught in a cycle of obsessions and compulsions. Obsessions are unwanted, intrusive thoughts, images or urges that trigger intensely distressing feelings. An anxiety disorder in which time people have recurring, unwanted thoughts, ideas or sensations (obsessions) that make them feel driven to do something repetitively (compulsions). The repetitive behaviors, such as hand washing, checking on things or cleaning, can significantly interfere with a person’s daily activities and social interactions. Many people have focused thoughts or repeated behaviors. But these do not disrupt daily life and may add structure or make tasks easier.

Relationships

Love is one of the most profound emotions known to human beings. There are many kinds of love, but most people seek its expression in a romantic relationship with a compatible partner. For some,>romantic relationships; are the most meaningful element of life, providing a source of deep fulfillment. The ability to have a healthy, loving relationship is not innate. A great deal of evidence suggests that the ability to form a stable relationship begins in infancy, in a child's earliest experiences with a caregiver who reliably meets the infant's needs for food, care, protection, stimulation, and social contact. Those relationships are not destiny, but they appear to establish patterns of relating to others. Failed relationships happen for many reasons, and the failure of a relationship is often a source of great psychological anguish. Most of us have to work consciously to master the skills necessary to make them flourish.

Personality Disorders

Personality Disorders According to DSM-5, a personality disorder can be diagnosed if there are significant impairments in self and interpersonal functioning together with one or more pathological personality traits. In addition, these features must be
  • relatively stable across time and consistent across situations,
  • not better understood as normative for the individual’s developmental stage or socio-cultural environment, and
  • not solely due to the direct effects of a substance or general medical condition.

Eating Disorders

Eating disorders are psychological conditions with both emotional and physical symptoms. The disorders include anorexia nervosa (voluntary starvation), bulimia nervosa (binge-eating followed by purging), binge-eating disorder (binge-eating without purging) and unspecified eating disorders (disordered eating that does not fit into another category).
Eating disorders occur frequently—but not exclusively—in affluent cultures. Biological factors, social pressure, and family history and dynamics are some of the factors associated with eating disorders.
Culturally mediated body-image concerns and personality traits like perfectionism and obsessiveness also play a large role in eating disorders, which are often accompanied by depression and/or anxiety.

Addictions

Addiction is a complex condition, a brain disease that is manifested by compulsive substance use despite harmful consequence. People with addiction (severe substance use disorder) have an intense focus on using a certain substance(s), such as alcohol or drugs, to the point that it takes over their life. People with a substance use disorder have distorted thinking, behavior and body functions. Changes in the brain’s wiring are what cause people to have intense cravings for the drug and make it hard to stop using the drug.

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